Episode recap: Gotham S.1., Ep. 1 — The pilot flutters, but doesn’t sputter


Gotham CastRight off the bat (no pun intended), I will fully admit that I am not the biggest Batman fan.  He isn’t my favorite for a variety of reasons.  However, I don’t detest him and I have read quite a bit of the lore due the sterling influence of my wife (although Cap is slowly digging his shield in further…yay!).  I think that Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy is superb filmmaking and perhaps the best rendition of the Caped Crusader to date, and if the UK’s Rocksteady has any say in my video game habits I will (once again) be purchasing the CE of next June’s Batman Arkham Knight and blitzing through a spectacular campaign and all-around awesome game.

Nevertheless…I digress, my hate/love relationship with Batman is rather moot, considering that Fox’s Gotham is the Bat media in relative question.  I was trepidatious about the whole affair.  I felt that the media gurus at DC and Fox were pushing for something that couldn’t be successful.  It was announced early on that none of the DC properties would relate, so there was no hope for an Arrow crossover or any bleed through to the films, and the castings are mostly unknowns…and comparatively young— Taking a page from the casting news of Fox’s Fantastic Four reboot, releasing 2015.

Gotham - Poison IvyIf I was going to watch Gotham I wanted Batman, not boy Wayne and the teen villain brigade.  However, what I did not expect…happened.  Instead of focusing on Bruce Wayne and the Batman, Gotham focuses on a young (not yet, Commissioner) Gordon and the exploits of the Gotham Police Department.  Throughout the GCDP’s ongoings and happenings audiences are privy to a plethora of Gotham City easter eggs.  This was a pleasant surprise because it takes a well-worn and critically acclaimed page from Frank Miller’s Batman: Year One (1987).

We get to see Poison Ivy as a girl, Catwoman as a thieving teenager, the Penguin as a conniving subordinate, a young comedian yet touched by chemicals, and a host of other side characters in the Gotham universe.  It is quite interesting, and I found myself giddy guessing who was whom and how their futures would eventually intertwine within Gotham.

Ben McKenzie plays a fantastic young, Detective Gordon.  His voice is just gravely enough, and he plays the part of the outsider trying to do good in a corrupt city.  The show primarily follows Gordon and his partner, Harvey Bullock (played by the talented Donal Logue).  The pilot starts out strong and in manner that I did not expect—  It was almost surprising.  Throughout the pilot’s plot (a murder investigation), Gotham sets the tone, mannerisms, and host of characters to be fleshed out in future episodes and seasons.

Gotham - SceneThe only downfall to Gotham is that it seems geared to fans who know a little bit more about the comic book lore and healthy does of knowledge concerning all of the nuanced characters of Gotham and how they relate.  This is great for an old school comic book fan like myself, but in inquiry I found that quite a few people found the show corny at moments and not as cohesive as Arrow, or its older, quality counterpart, Smallville.  More often than not, these individuals are willing to give the show a couple more episodes to see if they’ll warm up to it, but the general consensus is that was good but not great like comic book fans are making it out to be.

Nevertheless, I am willing to give it more time to come into its own.  It hooked this anti-Batman fan, and I am curious to see if Gotham can be groundbreaking or not— Time will tell.  Check back here next week for a recap of the second episode of Gotham airing on Fox on Mondays at 8/7c.

Book review: “Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution” by Keith R.A. DeCandido


Sleepy Hollow: Children of the RevolutionSleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution by Keith R.A. DeCandido

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Adaptations hardly ever do the source material justice. In fact, they often do just the opposite. They bomb. They are truly awful. Video game adaptations of film and televisions suck. Film adaptations of video usually bomb as well— Truly bad.

Books are not exempt from this unwritten rule, either. More often than not, novelizations of films and televisions are usually half-assed…they’re easy ways for publishers and TV shows to make a quick buck. Hardcore fans love ‘em, because they fill in on the lore of their favorite media properties but they lack in the quality department. Ultimately, they usually end up in a bargain bin somewhere dusting away.

“Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution” by Keith R.A. DeCandido is one of the few exceptions and counter-examples to the aforementioned rule. It reads well. From a technical standpoint it reads akin to that of a script from the television show. Most of the scenes are expressed in third-person via Ichabod Crane, and the plot line closely follows Crane and his partner Abbie’s exploits in modern day Sleepy Hollow.

One of the largest complaints that I usually have with book adaptations is their bare bones quality. They’re oft difficult to read. The writing is either done poorly because of time constraints (or a less-than experienced author), and the meat-and-potatoes of the novel suffers making it almost unreadable. DeCandidio has knowledge of the craft. Whether he was in a time crunch (or not) he pulls it off, and if you’ve ever read any decent third-person, supernatural themed novel then you’ll enjoy “Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution.” Its construction is solid.

Plot-wise it places in the midst of the first season— Right between the episodes, The Golem and The Vessel. The catalyst of the novel stems from a vision that Crane receives from his wife, Katrina, concerning medals bestowed by George Washington during the Revolutionary days. Moloch and his minions want the powerful relics for evil, thus the witnesses (Crane and Abbie) need to thwart them to further their objective of saving humanity. It follows the rough formula of each episode of the series, but it cuts nicely between two episodes to bring readers a little more information and insight into the characters and overall arc of the series.

All-in-all, “Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution” is a good read. It is solid in its own right as a supernatural thriller, and it pays fan service nicely to the acclaimed television series. It is definitely worth the gander.

For more information regarding the Sleepy Hollow television show and related media check out ARSchultz’s website (ARSchultz.com) and Facebook page. And, don’t forget to check out the sure-to-be amazing premiere of Sleepy Hollow season 2 tonight on FOX.

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“The Wolverine” Sketch Posters


While I was writing my review for “The Wolverine” I found these great sketch variant posters that I just needed to share.  I think they are pretty cool, and I wish I had seen more of them floating around during Fox‘s marketing for film.  Regardless, check out these awesome posters for “The Wolverine.”

 

 

Which animal should become anthropomorphized and included as a recurring character in the further adventures of “Mopey the Ferret and Malicious the Gorilla”?


Voting for the poll will end at the end of next week -Saturday to be exact-. So, make sure and vote before then, and then on Sunday, August 7th, I’ll be posting a new Mopey the Ferret, Malicious the Gorilla webtail introducing the new character chosen be you the reader!