Jeremy Robinson and co-author, Sean Ellis, release “Flood Rising”


Flood-Cover-6Jeremy Robinson, international bestseller of countless bestselling novels, resides in beautiful New Hampshire, and is best known for “mixing elements of science, history and mythology” into his work.  He has reached the #1 spot in Science Fiction and Action-Adventure due to his long pedigree, which includes Xom-B, Island 731, and SecondWorld as well as many, many others.

Sean Ellis is also an international bestseller.  “He is a veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom, and he has a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resources Policy from Oregon State University.”  The International Thriller Writers organization welcomes the Arizona resident as a member; currently, Ellis spends his time pondering on how to save the world, between writing bestsellers.

Flood Rising is the newest combined effort of Jeremy Robinson and Sean Ellis.  The two have teamed up before in the acclaimed Jack Sigler/Chess Team series.  This time around they are tackling a new project and thus an entirely new series.

Flood Rising follows Jenna Ford, a teen who stumbles across a bomb ticking down on her father’s boat.  This singular moment, takes Jenna from the Keys to the Glades to downtown Miami out into the Caribbean on a path from a team of killers hellbent on hunting her down.  With hidden potential and the seedy underbelly of the criminal underworld, Flood Rising, takes readers on an adventure that is sure to thrill and entertain till the very last page.

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Book review: “Xom-B” by Jeremy Robinson (2014)


XOM-BXOM-B by Jeremy Robinson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

“Xom-B” is one of Jeremy Robinson’s best novels to date. It takes a simplified approach to science fiction by being relatively plain spoken but incredibly deep by diving into the ramification and potential of humanity. It isn’t simplified in the derogatory sense, but much the opposite. It uses a specific style to accentuate the plot and subsequently, hard-hitting questions. It poses a myriad of inquiries that invoke his audiences into pondering their own existence and what it means to truly be a human.

Is it our characteristics? Our equal propensity for love and hate? Can we be something greater than we are now? All of these questions are touched upon inside the pages of “Xom-B”— Some more thoroughly than others but always touched upon. The depth at which Robinson explores these lofty topics seems to depend upon the narrative structure, or probably more intimately so…his own thoughts upon the questions themselves.

“Xom-B” begins by focusing on the near feature. Humans have advanced far enough where we have created life-like servants that provide us our every need, however, this leads to a grave injustice. Essentially, humans have created a new sect of society to subjugate and exploit. Decent people treat the artificial servants as one of their own, but there are just as many who do not. Some are sexually exploited, verbally and physically abused, while others are required to serve without question no matter the task. A tangible, ethical debate and rallying cry arises in the form of organized, peaceful protests from the aforementioned servants; the humans balk, and war ensues.

The plot then flashes forward to follow the most recent life of the new world order, Freeman; Freeman is fresh-faced, young, inquisitive, and intelligent. He questions authority and he seeks answers— The very mentality that could topple a fledgling empire and spark a new one…a better one. Audiences follow Freeman as he meets and allies himself with a wide cast of characters with their own unique strengths and weaknesses.

Robinson does a masterful job developing his characters. Each main character presented is given a proper backstory and motivation for their actions. The characters that strive to change (or at the least have the propensity to change) end up doing so with all pains present and included. The growth is logical and straightforward. This aids in the narrative and then culminates into near-perfect synergy…something much more than itself. The plot could be considered hard sci-fi, but because of how it is written it focuses so much more on character growth than the overall setting, atmosphere, and futuristic aspects of the framework. This results in a reminiscence of Arthur C. Clarke’s “Against the Fall of Night,” especially in its careful crafting to draw the reader’s focus to the overarching theme rather than the minutia. It may be classified science fiction in the strictest sense, but it poses big questions by following the journey of an individual trying to simultaneously escape, embrace, and find humanity.

An author’s style is an important facet to their career and writings, and some authors are fairly rigid in their methodology. Some stay well within their wheelhouse and constantly improve that particular style as they write throughout the years, others (like Jeremy Robinson) vary their style. They challenge themselves by matching a diverse cast of styles to the content, and in the case of “Xom-B” it pays off wonderfully. That being said, some longtime readers of Robinson may be put off because they prefer a singular style, while Robinson is delivering a different flavor. It would be hard to argue the validity of that point because in all honesty every reader reads differently.

“Xom-B” is a fantastic work of fiction. “Xom-B” is character driven, it provides insight and asks important questions in terms of what is means to be human, and it does so brilliantly in a straightforward plot that includes a great twist and conclusion. I highly recommend any reader who enjoys a quick-paced novel, science fiction, and/or the writings of Jeremy Robinson. He out does himself with “Xom-B” and I personally look forward to reading more of his work in the future.

View all my reviews

Colleen Gleason’s “The Clockwork Scarab” had me at “Hello.”


The Clockwork ScarabI follow several blogs and subscribe to even more emailings & newsletters that specifically advertise book releases, galleys (eCopy or otherwise), and ARCs.  I get a ton of inside information and advanced copies for review, but rarely do I read a blurb or press packet and get that ‘I must have it’ feeling.

It happened.

One of the aforementioned (and most-popular) email blasts that I subscribe to is called “Shelf Awareness.”  They send me a core email and a digest twice daily, and they are always chocked full of interesting book releases and information.

One such email graced my inbox yesterday (and ‘yes’ I still use Netscape.net as my email client) and sported a truly awesome advertisement for a novel called, “The Clockwork Scarab” by Colleen Gleason  What immediately grabbed me was the advertisements plug, which reads as follows:

Evaline Stoker, Sister of Bram, & Mina Holmes, Niece of Sherlock

This concept is truly brilliant.  Combining one of the most popular characters and writers of the 20th century (Sherlock Holmes & Bram Stoker) in a singular supernatural novel is something that needs to happen more often.  I recall first hearing about the sequel to Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” by his great grand-nephew, Dacre Stoker, and only then has my intrigue been rivaled by my interest in “The Clockwork Scarab.”

Considering the similar nature and tone of the source materials along with all of the wonderful television adaptations of Sherlock Holmes and modernizations of “Dracula” it makes perfect sense for these two classics to converge.

I look forward to cracking into Gleason’s “The Clockwork Scarab”–  She had me at the proverbial “Hello.”

(SOURCE:  Colleen Gleason’s “The Clockwork Scarab” had me at “Hello.”)

Pickup Stephen King’s new novel “Joyland” now!


JoylandStephen King’s recently released novel “Joyland,” which hit stores with a bang last month courtesy of Hard Case Crime, received solid marks from the NY Times, EW, and Goodreads.

Hard Case Crime specializes in mimicking the hardboiled, pulp novels of the 1940s and 50’s, and does so by recreating the process in which was taken when publishing similar novels of the aforementioned era. King first published with the imprint in 2005 with his novel, “Colorado Kid.”

Even though “Joyland” is only the second novel King has published with Hard Case Crime it fits with their mantra so snugly that King’s prose supposedly brought his editor, Charlie Ardai, to tears.

Amazon describes the tale as “the story of the summer in which college student Devin Jones comes to work as a carny and confronts the legacy of a vicious murder, the fate of a dying child, and the ways both will change his life forever.”

Stephen King has been a main proponent inePublishing and continues to support Amazon’s Kindle rigorously. However, this being said, “Joyland” will not be released digitally in an effort to support brick-and-mortar bookshops this summer, and marks one of the few occasions in which King will not be releasing an eEdition along with the hardcopy.

Stephen King had this to say about “Joyland,” working with Hard Case Crime, and taking a step back from the eBook industry this time around:

I love crime, I love mysteries, and I love ghosts. That combo made Hard Case Crime the perfect venue for this book, which is one of my favorites. I also loved the paperbacks I grew up with as a kid, and for that reason, we’re going to hold off on e-publishing this one for the time being. Joyland will be coming out in paperback, and folks who want to read it will have to buy the actual book.

Long story short, check out King’s newest novel, “Joyland,” at a book store near you. It is a wonderful coming of age tale, that harkens back to the one-and-twenty or the one yet to come. It’s universal and a fun read. Check back here for the review for “Joyland” in the coming weeks.