shout OUT!: Pop Goes the Geek Girl & Affiliates


It is easy to get lost in your own head.  We are all guilty of that at sometime or another, right?  Well, every once in a while I’ll get a snap back to reality and I’ll take a moment (or two) to appreciate those that define my life.

I have a very ebb and flow work style, which isn’t always conducive to long-lasting professional relationships.  My editor, Brian Triplett, has been a friend and colleague since I started contributing to the Examiner and he graciously agreed to start editing for me…merely because I asked.  That is an immense leap for anyone, and I doubt he realizes how much it means to me.

examinerdotcom-logoSo, if you get a chance:  Check out his Examiner page and blog, Pop Culture Warehouse.  They are both well-worth the read and subscription.  He covers a variety of topics from television, films, books, religious issues and news, mid-East relations, social media—  Essentially, the whole kit and kaboodle!

Like aforementioned, people are defined by others in their lives, and men are defined by the strong women in their lives.  The ol’ adage: “Behind every successful is man is a stronger woman,” is true.  I am fortunate enough to have three incredibly strong and successful women at my back who support me through thick-and-thin, and more-importantly define my day-to-day life.

My sister, Caitlin, is immensely intelligent (far smarter than I) and incredibly hardworking.  As a teenager she works nearly full-time whilst balancing family and school life with ease.  In her spare time she has numerous hobbies and pop culture addictions, and somehow, somewhere betwixt the chaos, she finds time to manage my ARSchultz Tumblr account and run her own blog with my equally talented mother, Chris Schultz.

My mother manages to take time management to a whole new level:  She works full-time as a teacher where she homeschools my younger brother as well as my sister, she then manages a household of four in its entirety (base to boards), and in between those full-time jobs she runs my sister back-and-forth for her shifts at work (around school lessons I might add) while indulging in hobbies ranging from pretty much anything in the sphere of pop culture that might nab her interest.  Then, on top of it all, she is an amazingly gifted poet and takes the time to handle the bulk of my social media endeavors—  She runs the official ARSchultz Facebook page, coordinates media blitzes and advertising, as well as wrangling me in when my work ethnic dips below subpar.

Nevertheless, I digress…

My sister and my mother have joined forces to create a new blog.  I know, I know…everyone has a blog, right?  Hell, you’re reading this on a blog right at this moment, so why should you had another to your RSS feed collection?

Well, you should and here is why:

cropped-geekPop Goes the Geek Girl is unique.  It hits on all things pop culture—  Music, film, television, books, etc., etc.  This unto itself isn’t standout-worthy, but what is the delivery and writing.  The writing is topnotch, better than you’ll find anywhere else, and then on top of it readers will be getting two perspectives for the price of free.  More often than not, pop culture reviews and insights get skewed, because of the person writing them, or more-specifically the age, background, current ongoings and situations of the writers, but what-if you had two writers working together in unison from different upbringings, generations, and predispositions, that absorbed the content together and each brought something to the table but a little bit differently?

The answer to that rhetorical question is a kickass blog that finds its footing in awesomeness and objectivity.  If you like art in any of its forms you need to check out this blog…it will not disappoint.

To subscribe, follow, and like Pop Goes the Geek Girl click here to be redirected.  Stay tuned there or here for more announcements concerning Pop Goes the Geek Girl.

 

Tell Me What’s Worth Fighting For?


Tell me what’s worth fighting for?

Inky blackness, wet with regret?

We stand alone in a crowd

We stand huddled in the masses

 

Being herded towards a cosmic cliff

Diving to the rainbow rocks below

Shades of brown becoming shades of red

My endurance meant nothing at the end

 

I’m not allowed to say certain things

I live listless nights portraying

a confidant, a friend, a mentor

All for nothing, all for nothing

All for nothing, all for nothing

 

Dew droplets rush past

Such a waste is the past

We reflect in torment the lives we changed

But we cry the most for our own

 

Drenched in sweat…we survive the fall

Born from the ashes of ourselves and battle

I converse in solace to two souls willing to prattle

We hit the bottom.

 

I jolt— Awake, confused and lost

I am among the land of the dead.

I shuffle with my brethren to the bread lines

Remembering my falling dream…my fallen dreams.

My crayon colored canyons filled with blood

New Year’s Resolutions– Meh. New Year’s Goals– Better.


New Year's GoalsI have a woeful habit of never making New Year’s resolutions.  I despise them more than Sauron wants the ring, and the Shire to burn.  No one ever keeps them.  By the time the big game rolls around the treadmill lies covered in dust in the corner of the family room stacked with Mountain Dew and Budweiser, which by all means is fine and American, but makes me feel  sad inside like an episode of Star Trek without a Tribble.

Resolutions are difficult– Not because they are unobtainable, but rather because people set out to accomplish tasks that are lifelong endeavors instead of focused, specific goals.  Eating healthier, exercising, quitting smoking, and getting that next big promotion are all worthy to work towards, but they are lifelong and can very rarely be accomplished in a single year.  If you quit smoking, it will be a lifelong struggle against addiction and temptation.  First steps are fantastic and I encourage anyone to go for them, but I think paring down to a single year undercuts the premise and inevitably leads people to fail which then perpetuates a cycle.

With this in mind,  I set out to resolve my hatred of New Year’s resolutions by twisting it up a bit and altering the premise into something a bit more manageable.  I set out to make a list of ten goals (in place of the traditional resolution) that could be accomplished in a single year.  Tasks that have definitive start and end dates with a concrete product in mind.  I picked one larger goal for the year and nine smaller goals which were generally pop culture, career, and/or related to my family and friends.

Obviously a person’s list will vary (akin to a list of New Year’s resolutions), so mine may seem odd or out of place but as far as my personal preferences and goals are concerned they fit it perfectly.  So, for 2014, here is my list of ten goals to accomplish by December 31st, 2014.

2014 New Year’s Goals

1.  Run a successful KickStarter project.

2.  Read all of Jonathan Ames’ work

3.  Finally beat Final Fantasy VIII and XII

4.  Refurbish Celeste’s [(my wife)] dresser and sewing desk as well as out wine rack

5.  Save and purchase a PS Vita (keyword being “save”)

6.  Make a wicked, awesome Halloween costume (Booker DeWitt)

7.  Collect Claremont-Miller four-part miniseries, “The Wolverine.”

8.  Read and then watch “Dune.”

9.  Finally read “Game of Thrones.”

10.  Finish writing “At the Top” and both “Dorian” tales.

Comment below to include some of your New Year’s goals and or resolutions.  I would love to see and help anyone accomplish a personal goal, as I will be sharing mine as I complete them throughout the year.  I keep my handwritten list tucked away in an envelope on my nightstand, so that I can keep in mind.

My Open Love Letter to Music


Feeling the quick-paced displacement of your heart, as it flutters to the beat of a specific drum, is nothing shy of facing mortality.  Music gives you the momentum to strive for inner greatness.  Immortals lack creativity, because that one moment that gives life meaning…never comes.  It hangs stagnant in the air, being ignored by those that don’t care; however for us mere mortals we thrive off of the thought of death.  We design our society around it– For death not only accentuates life…it gives it meaning.  Music is an extension of this elongated metaphor.  It makes my heart beat rapidly, just as it does when I think of Celeste, or put pen to paper.  It is an eternal muse, that I will always try to please, because it has given me so much.  Thank you musicians of the world.  Thank you.

Reblog: “To Read or Not To Read…Reviews” by Jeremy Robinson


I am huge fan of the author Jeremy Robinson.  I try to follow his posts and updates through Goodreads, and for the most part I am successful.  This post particularly caught my eye, because the act of critiquing and being critiqued is a hard pill to swallow for anyone especially a writer.  I think that Jeremy Robinson sums it up best in his latest blog entry.

Check out his post, and visit the original at Goodreads.com and his website by clicking the aforementioned links.

To Read or Not To Read…Reviews by Jeremy Robinson

ben-661x1024I’ve seen a good number of blog posts recently from fellow authors focusing on the issue of reviews, which can be, and often are, posted by folks with rude dispositions, grudges, agendas, etc. For a new author, even an honest negative review can be soul crushing. To the experienced author, with thicker skin, negative reviews can be a distraction. So the advice being given is generally this: don’t read reviews for your books. Sounds good on the surface. By not exposing yourself to these negative opinions, you are protecting yourself from the pain delivered by Internet trolls with nothing better to do than harass an author. The troll might be angry after reading the first line of a book sample, or might disagree with the pricing, or might be annoyed that Harriet Klausner gave your book 4 stars, or any number of silly reasons for an anonymous rant. And YES, these people should be ignored. They’ve likely taken to the Internet for attention, because the people in their real lives have begun ignoring their sour mood.

BUT, by ignoring ALL reviews you are also missing out on some well thought-out critique. Many readers, including some die-hard fans who know your books better than you do, take time to offer honest opinions, often based on a lifetime of reading. To discount this suggests a few things that I don’t think are good for any writer, new or experienced:

1) That your writing is flawless, or at least so far advanced that Joe-reader can’t find a flaw.

2) That you can’t learn from your fans, or even from your detractors.

3) That readers are, in a way, the enemy, if they don’t like your book.

4) That you are detached from your fans.

Now, before anyone hates on me for implying authors who ignore reviews are fan-hating ego-maniacs, that’s not what I’m saying. The point is that they’re missing out. On connecting with readers. On improving as authors. On increasing sales (in the long run). As someone who has received his fair share of angry, spiteful and even hateful reviews, I understand the temptation to turn away from reading reviews entirely. A bad review, especially a scathing one that is…accurate…can ruin your day. But they can also make future days brighter, if you pay attention to what is being said.

I didn’t begin my creative career as a writer. I went to art school. And every day, we would draw or paint, carve or shape, pouring ourselves into the creation of an image in the same way that an author does a novel. And at the end of every day, we would line them all up and spend a half hour critiquing. And not always gently. And this is universal to art schools. There is something about visual arts culture that recognizes the best way to improve is through frequent honest critique and listening to that critique. This process became part of my creative experience and still is today. I love critique, because whenever someone takes the time to work out the flaws in my art, or writing (and there will always be flaws), I get better.

A few years ago, after the release of THRESHOLD and before I started writing SECONDWORLD, I went to my editor and said, I’ve done three hardcovers for you now. I want to take things to the next level. Tear me apart. Tell me what I can do better. And he did, but not before saying, with a trace of amazement, “You are the first author to ever ask me to do this,” which surprised me at the time, but I’ve since learned that authors really don’t enjoy being told what’s wrong with their writing, or stories, and maybe their blog posts on the subject. :)  But the result of this critique, and my applying it to SECONDWORLD, was that sales doubled, the book got a lot of press and my audience grew.

As a writer, I began as a self-publisher. Without any connections in the writing world, I had only two sources of honest critique: my wife and my readers. I released five novels on my own (what I now call the Origins Editions), and the improvement from book to book is pretty obvious. Without honest readers, I’d never have improved, and I’d never have signed a deal with Thomas Dunne Books and 47 North, or become a bestselling self-published author.

But why am I still reading reviews? I have an editor. Hell, I have FOUR editors. And an agent. And lots of author pals. Why still read the reviews?

Because I am not writing for my editors, or my agent, or my author pals. I am writing for YOU, the reader, and for ME. While I pick the content most of the time, I listen to my fans. I’ve written and am writing sequels, because of requests from fans. I’m currently writing I AM COWBOY because of how many people expressed their love of the Czech Cowboy from SECONDWORLD. And I’m still reading reviews because I want my future books to be better than they are now. And that’s only going to happen if 1) honest people speak their mind, and 2) I listen.

Last October, I released RAGNAROK, the fourth Jack Sigler book, co-authored with Kane Gilmour. Kane did an amazing job at matching my style, and we worked closely throughout the process, but I knew it would be different than the previous three. That it would feel different. That there would be flaws introduced simply because it was a collaboration and because I’m not perfect, and neither is Kane (and he would agree). So I was very pleased when a few reviewers spotted these flaws that I couldn’t see and pointed them out in reviews. And after reading them, I agreed with many of them and discussed them with Kane. We’re working hard to apply them to OMEGA, which will be an even better book than RAGNAROK, which I should point out was my first Amazon.com bestseller and has a 4.5 star rating after 110 reviews.

So, if you’re an author, buck the trend that says you don’t need to read reviews. Yes, ignore the nut-jobs. Skim the 5 stars if time is short. But pay attention to those 2 – 4 star reviews. Critiques shouldn’t be feared, ignored or undervalued. They’re good for you. Sure, there are tons of people reviewing books, and not all of them are right, but those nuggets of insight from dedicated fans and readers are invaluable. If you really believe that a reader can’t possibly improve a writer, you’re mistaken. My readers, who are awesome, dedicated, intelligent and invested, are the very BEST people to critique my books.

And if you are one of my readers, know that I am listening, that your opinion matters and that I am doing my best to make sure each and every book is better than the last.

– Jeremy Robinson